From The C.A.L.M. PRINciples book

Hello Fellow Writer, Reader, Journal Lover, and Rambling Creator!

Enjoy some free writing prompts and links to writing tools you can use to help make writing a part of your wellness routines!

-Prin 🙂

Writing Prompts and Ideas – March 2021

  1. Make lists of 100 for a variety of topics that provide you with happiness, smiles, or good memories. Gratitude lists, childhood memories, special vacations, favorite foods, and a variety of other interests can make for a lovely goal to reach 100 on a list of positivity.
  2. Many people struggle to maintain journaling, but it can be easier to jot down incomplete sentences. The purpose of journaling is to log the thoughts, feelings, or events you are wishing to express. There’s no need for polished sentences in raw form.
  3. Go outside and describe what you see in nature for 10 minutes. If you don’t feel like writing, use the voice memo feature on your phone and keep an audio journal. There are also cool recording pens!
  4. Write a note card to a family member or friend with no special occasion in mind.
  5. Read the news or Google something of interest, and paraphrase your feelings about what you just read. You can use a Word or Google doc for this. This helps ensure you are reading and processing the information you take in on the internet.

Writing Prompts and Ideas – April 2021

  1. For 1 week, write down in a small notebook or type notes of phrases, unique sayings, or anything that catches your attention from the things other people say around you. At the end of the week, circle all repeating words to see what topics most surround you.
  2. Identify your best characteristic from 10 years ago. It could be physical, mental, professional, emotional, academic (anything goes), and write a 500 word “story” about yourself. It can be a hybrid of fiction and non-fiction. If you feel creative, make it a scrapbook about your life.
  3. Listen to 30 minutes of any genre of music while writing or typing anything that comes to mind. The sentences or words do not have to make sense or create a coherent essay or story. Stream of consciousness can be very healing and insightful.

Writing Prompts and Ideas – September 2021

  1. When people tell you “that ship has sailed,” remember how storms have a way of bringing back things that have been lost at sea. What are the storms in your life? What are things lost in the sea of life’s many distractions? What are things people have discouraged you from pursuing?
  2. Vulnerability and manipulation often look like the same thing. List 10 of your relationships, current and / or past, and think of how you and the other person engaged in vulnerability and manipulation.
  3. Go outside and focus on one aspect of nature. It could be a specific blade of grass and its movement in the breeze, a tree swaying with leaves, or wildlife behavior. Bring a paper and pen, or voice memo record yourself making observations. Make it fun and create a scavenger hunt.

Writing Prompts and Ideas – October 2021

  1. Stare at a cup. Write freely about the types of things you have seen, smelled, tasted, touched, heard, and felt with this cup. Choose a favorite coffee mug and see where the idea takes you. Maybe spend 5-10 minutes writing about only this cup.
  2. Toxic positivity inspires people to make bad choices under the idea that they are taking care of their inner child or doing what is best for them through avoidance. Avoidance is not the same thing as healing and making the effort towards being calm. What do you avoid?
  3. Write a letter to a deceased hero in your life. This person could be a personal relationship, but they could also be someone from centuries ago!

Writing Prompts and Ideas-November 2021

  1. Find old pictures of yourself as a child, teen, or young adult. Pick one that stands out to you somehow. Write a letter to yourself as you were in this photo. Tell yourself about your life and treat this old version of you like a pen pal.
  2. Give thanks for 5 memories that involve the holidays with family or friends. Write down what happened and be as detailed as possible about who, what, where, when, and how the memories took place.
  3. Go outside if you live in a seasonal geographic location, or look up autumn leaf changes online, and describe the colors by writing down what they remind you of – use metaphors and similes. For example, the red leaves looked like cherries. If you’re feeling creative, draw or color, too!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s